Facts That You Should Know About Patient Data Breach

The purpose of this site is for Consumer Protection and thwarting victimization by criminal attackers and negligent organizations in the handling of data breach incidents.

I am compelled to start this blog in an effort to provide consumers, law enforcement, and governing Patient Data Breach bodies the real facts of a data breach incident and not the facts that organizations are paying their law firms to spin. I hope that this site will be a revelation to all and create a sea of change at the c-suite level, and boardrooms worldwide.

The handling of data breach incidents cost us all as a result that is often times directly related to the and Boardroom decisions to either be transparent or play the deny game. Do these organizations that report to care about their customer victims really care? The answer is unequivocally, yes! However much like everything else, there are a few bad-apples out there. A recent breach incident has compelled me to share the truth about.

I have a list of several organizations that I have alerted to a data breach incident and was rebuffed by their upper management, c-suite, boardrooms, and legal counsel. The first blog I will report today will be the facts of the breach and the deny games this c-suite has chosen to play. I have reached out to them to offer free of charge assistance to help them protect their customer victims and brand.

patient privacy monitoring

After several attempts via phone calls and emails to this insurance company, and their counsel in and their at their headquarters to address the matter they ceased to respond to me. They did however Protecting Patient Privacy contact a law enforcement agency to file a complaint against me. Long story short, three months later the incident went public, then one month later their, in a quarterly telephone report shared that, their company had fallen victim to a data breach incident by an insider.

This was the information I was trying to share with them but they chose the deny game rather than responsibility, and by doing so the bad actor has gone unpunished. The bad-actor/insider was a former employee that frequently returned to one of the insurance agent’s office to visit with friends. The policy of this insurance agency was only to use one shared login and password agency wide for employees, notably the bad actor shared that the login and password had not been changed since his departure from the company several years prior, and that the manager kept it written on a note taped to her desk.

Organizations that ignore data breach alerts are criminally complacent.The Deep Web is bigger than the Internet you know, and its subspace, the Darknet, is essentially an unchartered and lawless frontier. Cyber insurance providers are too victims of negligent organizations. Click Here